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 Post subject: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 07:16 
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Aitor Throup's
New Object Research

with Anteros and @ww3madic off of tumblr. All photo credits go to ww3madic

First impressions: Extremely technical and well executed. Featured water resistant materials, taped seams, intricate seaming. The way the garments were presented made me feel a strong loneliness (as well as awe in seeing it for the first time).

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Last edited by alex on 01 Dec 2013, 07:50, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 07:22 
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Veil Jacket
Image


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 07:31 
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Tube Neck Long Sleeve

Attachment:
aitor11.jpg

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Riding Jacket

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 07:33 
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Sketches

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 07:40 
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Stockwell Jeans

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 10:08 
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damn, this stuff is beautiful, thanks for sharing. i remember seeing this riding jacket in paris last winter, it was really impressive.


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 01 Dec 2013, 13:56 
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^ Speaking of that, I never published these images before but I guess better late than never. I took these at the showroom in Paris in January. The technical aspect of his designs is truly fascinating.

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 02 Dec 2013, 08:23 
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Hey, thanks for posting that Flux. I do wish I got to see at least the skull backpack. The small case (unsure of its purpose) was insanely well made from what I could see. Wish I got to handle the skull backpack. Do you have any pictures of the format of the exhibition or showroom or where ever you got the pictures?


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 02 Dec 2013, 14:19 
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This stuff is astonishing. Thanks for posting!

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 02 Dec 2013, 22:50 
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alex! these pics are huge as fuck!

i wish connor (or anyone else) had gotten better pictures of the gusset work on this stuff., because that was the real raw for me.

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all of the tops were actually built on the same block, even the shirting, but with the front panels slashed away and wholly reworked to become a suit, a denim jacket, etc
i figure he used this sort of overbuilt gusset construction to make up for the zero stretch that the heatlocked seaming gives, so the fabric could be slim fitting, without being stressed, but without being difficult to move in. it bears a lot of similarity to some arming doublets i've seen, old fitting techniques that are truer than modern techniques but too laborious for mass production.

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note how there's a seam running over the breasts and scapula, which is actually a continuation of the sleeve. it's an ancient technique, kind of hypermodernist in this context.

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2013, 22:28 
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you did tell me to post the hi-res pics, so it seems I do know what's good for me :-)

Great contribution- now that you mention the ancient techniques as hypermodernist in context, I see that it definitely contributes a lot to the atmosphere of the collection; I felt as if the garments were all very human, they triggered an emotion in me that I can only define as reminiscent? I don't know the proper way to elaborate myself- garments such as the veil jacket reminded me of militia garments from the Fascist Regime- bringing me to quote Herr Urst's post: "Same goes for any kind of weapon or equipment from that time. VERY overdesigned from the smallest handgun to the tank."

Aitor's garments, however, drew upon those seemingly overdesigned concepts and brought the technical, functional aspects up to par with the design.

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Hopefully you can see where I'm coming from- I don't seem to have the vocabulary to fully articulate how I felt, but with time I probably will.

Where did you get those scans from?


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2013, 04:18 
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I couldn't argue for that jacket necessarily being rooted in the German garment, the language is too vague and shared by too many iterations of militaria and techwear.

The scans just come from endless research, on various garments throughout history. Arming doublets are especially interesting because they're the genesis of our modern sleeve shapes; the earliest sleeves were made by just wearing big cross shapes, slashing open a neckline, and fastening up the sides, and later sewing them with needle and thread. When the switch was made to articulated plate armor, these sleeves were too bulky to fit beneath them and slimming them up made them too restrictive, so various methods were proposed; sometimes the sleeves were separate pieces, like full length armwarmers that tied to the torso of the doublet, sometimes they were very complex cut-on gussets like the photo I posted, but the sleeve shape that won the day was our modern set sleeve, usually with a gusset added or incorporated into the undersleeve. That gusset eventually went away, and that's why when you put on a suit at All Saints, you can't lift your arms above your shoulders.

Aitor is far from the first person to mine the pivot sleeve; it's used very frequently in couture, it's used commonly in cut on sleeves when done by better labels. Rick uses it all the time, mostly on the women's jackets, Devoa used it on that suit you can do yoga in, I've seen it on Carol, I've seen it on Boris (combined with some unholy permutation of three different sleeve styles every time). But I know where they got it, they got it from dance wear and old school mountain climbing gear, when people did that stuff in suits. Aitor's moved me because I immediately recognized that shape from arming doublets that I had seen. And it works here better than a pivot sleeve, because I doubt that the meltlock seaming has any stretch to speak of, so he displaced the seams, the structurally weak points, away from where they're going to be stressed, and he was able to do this sort of slender box fit with slender sleeves in a fabric with no stretch and seaming with no stretch by stuffing ease into that gusset panel.

i'll go ahead and buttress this by pointing out the similarity between his jeans and the thorsburg trousers.

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now, he's not reproducing these 1:1, they're updated with what we've learned about fitting since then. this isn't medieval repro, it's hypermodernist techsteelo

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2013, 05:44 
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^thanks much for that backdrop, i've been simultaneously intrigued and nonplussed by aitor since i first saw his sketches ages ago but, being unlikely i'll ever get around to seeing it in person, this kind of explanation (and hi-def detail shots, thanks to whoever took those) is quite helpful. i guess i'm slightly less nonplussed, now.

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2013, 05:52 
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alex, please resize the attachments when you get the chance. cheers.

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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2013, 06:56 
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Thanks so much for that indepth explanation, anteros. Really interesting to see what all that seaming's purpose is- I've still got a lot to learn on garment construction.

Merz, will do, as soon as I have access to my own computer! For the time being, sorry!


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 04 Dec 2013, 07:52 
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as i understand it, the taping is used as a reinforcement because some fabrics can't hold that type of stitch on their own.

i don't remember how it was that i found aitor's work originally, but sometime in 2006 or 2007 i found myself discussing it with an illustrator friend who was attending RISD at the time. apparently some word of aitor's illustrations and images from his manchester poly graduation collection had shown up online and were gobbled up by students. every now and again someone comes with a uniqueness of vision that permeates every aspect of their work, from rendering to the more fundamental ideas at its core.

though we sometimes have discussed poell in context of his clothes as objects separate from the wearer - square shapes with sleeves mounted on the walls in a presentation mimicking a gallery display, fiberglass coats, shoes encased. objects rendered ostensibly useless, but there is also the side that has taken an active interest in the wearer. or even a kind of imposition upon the wearer - what philip nod once referred to as the terrifying possibility of having your invisi-seam crotch wink out of existence consequence to a single wrong move. to be fair, i'm not sure that one was all that intentional, but there are plenty of examples in garments being not so much uncomfortable as training the body in the same way the corset does, in the same way you think of breaking in a pair of shoes when what really gives way is your walk, altered through a series of momentary discomforts. to that effect, poell's garments, however familiar their origins, have that ability to dramatically alter the wearer's proportions and silhouettes in ways rather uncommon.

seeing throup's illustrations and early show images reminded me in part of that, and a sort of common progenitor to the combined end result, if not the explicit idea.

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meet the very unlikely progenitors of techwear, varvara stepanova & lyubov popova. both were russian cubist/supermatist/futurist painters and illustrators in the years leading up to the russian revolution, where the idea of an instant future and a new aesthetic for the new soviet man was seen by some as the image of a radiant tomorrow. at least until it was trampled by social realism shortly thereafter. these women were translating the already-established constructivist aesthetic into clothing for the common man - economical, accessible, durable, functional but also carrying within itself cues of that aesthetic that seems to be, however slightly, at odds with our laws of physics.

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so, when i saw aitor's thoughts on his own work with regard to what it was trying to achieve, there seemed to be a certain degree of awareness in what he was proposing, something that in poell's work was a side-effect to his desire to subvert and manipulate the wearer, here consciously acknowledged as a kind of ultimate end unto itself - stressing the boundary between the artist's stylisation denoting the boundaries of their own world and forcing the precise resulting shapes and images into physical existence, however much they may resist. it was a pretty exciting time because big ideas like that, while not new, are a rarity in a sea of thematic juxtaposition. in ways the means available to someone today in exercising an idea like that are different than they were back when. that still was not soon enough for aitor. while his skill at illustration quickly became the stuff of legend, getting the actual clothes to look anywhere near this good had taken a long while. perhaps long enough for him to lose interest in being the maker of clothes. and who can really blame him? given the amount of innovation, the people involved, the effort that has gone into putting something like this together relative to the pay-off, it should be plainly clear that most involved in making things of the sort are either performing a labour of love that may pay for itself, or are using such work as a stepping stone on the way to something else with a more favourable ratio of effort vs. reward. i would not be surprised if aitor, who had always referred to himself as a product designer rather than someone involved in 'fashion', already has his sights set for greener pastures. somehow i don't foresee this sort of a collection happening again.

and so what we're left with is sort of what many of us have expected from the very start - a small, proof-of-concept run. aitor has proven that yes, it can be done.. and if you're the right size for a handful of items that various stores have picked up at price range summed up as fucking absurd, you could have a piece of costume history that, assuming humanity does not blow itself to kingdom come within the next century or so, could hold up pretty well in some future museum display next to those constructivist dresses.


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2014, 18:01 
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@Alex

On topic of the Veil jacket, that's actually the same layout/design down to the hooks, pouches and even the veil in the hood/collar as the Swiss Army Paratrooper jacket. The difference being the Camo/cotton. Sadly I don't have mine with me right now, so I can't take proper pictures of the detailing but eh. It's certainly "inspired" by it.


So a rather recent and technical thing already. Just more streamlined and different materials.


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 Post subject: Re: Aitor Throup
PostPosted: 02 Jan 2014, 18:52 
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interesting. i know that aitor appropriates such things liberally from a background of very tech-oriented references, but it is the first such i'm noticing taken directly from an existing military reference wholesale. i've resized he attachments and this thread should now be more clearly readable.

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