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PostPosted: 10 Jun 2014, 23:38 
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crazy dream, hope you have some nicer ones tonight : )


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PostPosted: 01 Jul 2014, 20:27 
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I suppose this is the right thread to discuss novels we've enjoyed recently? I had the pleasure to read, err audiobooked, Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides while driving cross country and I actually enjoyed it more than "The Virgin Suicides". Really interesting plot concept that the child is genuinely unaware she/he is different than the girls around her, and that until she learns the medical facts of her condition she doesn't even allude to ever having feelings of being a boy. Anyways, I'd just like to talk novels and share recommendations if anyones interested. Too hot to spend time outside in the summers so I'll probably be sitting in my local coffee shop putting hours into reading. Only seasons I can brace are fall and spring.


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PostPosted: 25 Oct 2014, 05:34 
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oh hello i come 3 months late but I recently finished reading the marriage plot, also by eugenides, very much loved the virgin suicides and am looking to get ahold of middlesex - i actually kinda got put off on getting it because trans politics is so hot right now and it irritates me somewhat - which is a stupid reason not to get a book which was written almost two decades ago and has not that much to do with the trans identity politics today (or does it? I don't know and I guess I didn't really want to know either)

I was very impressed with eugenides' writing, which was so sensitive to the particularities of so many differing perspectives, i was so impressed i thought it was godly, seeing everything intimately from far above

anyway what is everybody reading right now?


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PostPosted: 05 Jan 2015, 00:58 
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(Squeaking in under the 3-month mark.)

Probably the best literature I've read over the past winter has been by Frederick Rolfe, or Baron Corvo. I don't usually like back-of-book excerpts, because they seldom do justice to anything worth writing an excerpt about in the first place, and so I will stick mostly to quotation:

[on letting ne'er-do-wells into church] Your opinion is formed upon the apprehensive sentimentality of pious old-ladies-of-both-sexes whose ideal of Right is the Not-obviously Wrong. When a thing is unpleasant, they go up a turning; wipe their mouths; and mistake evasion for annihilation. They don't annihilate the evil; they avoid it. Now, we are here to seek and to save that which was lost: and our churches must be more free to the lost than to the saved--if any be saved.

William Blake says that truth lies in extremes. To the humdrum champion of the so-called golden mean (which generally is a great deal more mean than golden), that maxim is nothing less than scandalous. All the same, it is as sound as a bell...

[It was a] collection of eccentric young artists' mistakes of the large for the great, of the weird for the wonderful, of wildness for wisdom, of the How for the What, of technique for type. ... 'Here's another Physidol, another born slave afraid of original thinking, able only to ape instead of using his gifts and striking out a line of his own,' Crabbe said sickly to himself.

And then, all of a sudden, on this iridescent morning of opals in January, when the lips of Zildo touched the hand of Nicholas, owner of lips and owner of hand experienced a single definite shock: an electric shiver tingled through their veins: hot blood went surging and romping through their hearts: a blast, as of rams' horns, sang in their ears and rang in their beings; and down went all sorts of separations. They were bewitched. They were startled beyond measure. Of course we others are well aware that this was merely the commonplace casting of the commonplace spell by their millions of dead ancestors recognizing (in these two) the possessors by inheritance of the multitudinous charm of all their own dead loves -- that it was nothing more than a quickening in these separated entities of the dormant prenatal knowledge of homogeneity.

(Shivers, at that last.) Extracted, variously, from the novels Hadrian the Seventh, and The Desire and Pursuit of the Whole. If these nuggets entice you, read Rolfe's biography on Wikipedia, which reads like a novel of its own; and if you decide to dip into his works, and enjoy them, then afterwards you'll need to pick up The Quest for Corvo, which is a masterpiece of imaginative biography.

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PostPosted: 05 Jan 2015, 20:22 
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^ thanks for sharing MJRH. That sounds interesting.
I've recently seen Under the Skin, a really great film, based on the book of the same title by Michel Faber. If anyone has read this book, let me know what you thought of it.


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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2015, 18:01 
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"Corvo was one of those men who never speak a word if they can write it. We lived in the same house, a very little one, yet he would always communicate with me by note if I was not in the same room with him."

Lol I wonder how he'd function in today's world with the internet. I definitely feel more comfortable typing my thoughts than speaking them.


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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2015, 21:14 
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:lol: He'd surely take the cake for getting banned from social media. When he worked up a full head of steam, he was vituperation itself.

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 Post subject: Re: Short Stories
PostPosted: 31 May 2015, 23:36 
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crouka wrote:
the moon in his pocket
one evening mr. moon was walking with himself in his pocket on a hilly road his shoelace came undone he was bending down to tie it when mr.moon rolled out of his pocket and down the slope on the rain-slick asphalt he rolled over and over and over and over rolling to the end of the earth mr.moon ran after mr.moon but since he was moving ever so quickly the interval between mr.moon and mr.moon gradually grew far apart this is how mr.moon lost sight of himself in the blue mists far below



one more from one thousand and one-second stories
here looks like I is something like photos replicants or humans would collect and treasure,
the past, history, momories or fantasy.


somehow just saw this. is "chasing the moon" also an idiom in japanese? is the story cleverly thumbing its nose at the search for personal identity, or is that a quirk of translation?

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PostPosted: 03 Jun 2015, 18:31 
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although it's not an idiom in particular, yes basically it mocks at such stuff as certainty of a consciousness we call I (or appropriation of memories). taruho inagaki refuses to be confined within it or even to the earth. so he likes airplanes, stars, cosmic nostalgia, etc.

if some say for example "why?" or "wtf" reading the translation, they might say the same about the original too. one thousand and one-second stories is the work with which he made his debut. and he stated all the other works he did for the rest of his life were only footnotes added to the first one. it's like a little box of condensed gems which one writer's oeuvre is made out of.

one more
Quote:
the moonman
in a nocternal scene out of Tales of Hoffman a man appears from within the rising moon he wanders the hills and the edges of ponds and the tree-lined avenues he goes back into a moon that traces a mighty arc overhead as it falls that time a bang! went off I realized that the moonman was the person just returning from a walk who shut the door behind - myself



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PostPosted: 03 Jun 2015, 21:43 
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thanks for the clarification - it's just funny that translation actually amplified the meaning! almost always does the opposite.

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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2016, 15:11 
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While reading this article I couldn't help thinking of the story "The Book" we read a while ago and discussed together here :) http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... -awakening
The journalist Monbiot asks his readers if anyone knows the name of a book, which he read when he was a kid and which triggered his political awakening. In the next article (http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... ange-world), having found the book and re-read it, he writes about the changes his mind has done to the original story.


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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2016, 17:46 
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Cute story! The memory changes he talks about make sense, a conservative young Englishman would probably elide an alien idea like Pan. (Bartlett's War of the Ghosts)

Do you have any books like that? I actually never had a da-ding moment with literature, though it was Henry Miller, bless him, who happened to funnel me into some more interesting waters, on account of how often he name-drops authors.

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PostPosted: 06 Jan 2016, 18:24 
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Haha yeah, it's interesting in which way his mind altered the story ;)
Hmm, I don't know if books played that kind of role in my childhood, but I had a somewhat similar experience with some films, which seemed absolutely amazing on the first watch, while later on when I watched them again, they weren't so special anymore. Which kind of recommendations did you find in H. Miller's books?


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PostPosted: 07 Jan 2016, 04:18 
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He introduced me to Blaise Cendrars, Djuna Barnes, Krishnamurti, Anais Nin, Lawrence Durrell (of course!), Herman Hesse, Theophile Gautier, and Moishe Nadir. Not a shabby list! But more than anything, I was taken with his shameless, freewheeling, irreverent style of recommendation. Idols are burned, pulp fiction praised, and there's no question, whatever you may think of Miller's own writing, that every single opinion he gives is never affected but honestly given.

Incidentally, he was a bit of a dandy, given the means :D

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PostPosted: 08 Jan 2016, 01:49 
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interesting, nice short review :)


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2016, 18:26 
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Anyone else waiting on The Moons At Your Door? Big collection of short stories which have influenced David Tibet and the Current 93 output. I have the limited edition on pre-order but, as with many books related to Tibet it seems, there come delays and delays. Either way I am quite excited for it to ship whenever it may be.

Quote:
An anthology of strange fiction and hallucinatory tales, The Moons At Your Door collects chilling stories by many innovators of the weird whilst drawing attention to little-known and shamefully underrepresented or forgotten scribes of the macabre.

The Moons At Your Door collects over 30 tales, both familiar and unknown from:

Robert Aickman, Algernon Blackwood, DK Broster, AM Burrage, RW Chambers, Aleister Crowley, Elizabeth Gaskell, WW Jacobs, MR James, LA Lewis, Thomas Ligotti, Arthur Machen, Guy de Maupassant, Perrault, Thomas De Quincey, Saki, Count Stenbock and HR Wakefield. The volume also includes extracts and translations by the author from Babylonian, Coptic and Biblical texts alongside poems and fairy tales.


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PostPosted: 16 Jan 2016, 00:51 
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I have been eyeballing that but, as of today, it costs $94 cdn, so maybe not just now :x please do give a report here when you get it!

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PostPosted: 04 Jun 2016, 17:55 
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Recently reread one of my favorite science fiction short stories by one of my favorite authors:

http://faculty.gordonstate.edu/ddavis/F ... 20Ring.pdf

Desolation Road, Ian McDonald's first novel, is also a favorite. I came into sci-fi through the above story and Desolation Road––Neuromancer, Snow Crash, and other, more function-driven work (what does that mean? I think I know. Paging excelsiom, we talked about this I think...) came later, and didn't have quite as big an impact on me. Verthandi's Ring manages to be a more human(?) story than anything Gibson, even though the characters are uploaded post humans in squid bodies fighting an interstellar war millions of years in the future. Why is that?


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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2016, 06:23 
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Chautauqua wrote:
Recently reread one of my favorite science fiction short stories by one of my favorite authors:

http://faculty.gordonstate.edu/ddavis/F ... 20Ring.pdf

Desolation Road, Ian McDonald's first novel, is also a favorite. I came into sci-fi through the above story and Desolation Road––Neuromancer, Snow Crash, and other, more function-driven work (what does that mean? I think I know. Paging excelsiom, we talked about this I think...) came later, and didn't have quite as big an impact on me. Verthandi's Ring manages to be a more human(?) story than anything Gibson, even though the characters are uploaded post humans in squid bodies fighting an interstellar war millions of years in the future. Why is that?


That's a great short story. Reminds me of some of the interesting speculations I've read from post-humanists recently. Although those tend to much darker when it comes to the possible survival of humanity. Interesting how much influence such sci-fi and sci-fi-like writing has on some of the top peeps in silicone valley. I suppose it's the frist example of a group of powerful people who all grew up on hard sci-fi.


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PostPosted: 17 Jul 2016, 14:35 
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stucking to high scifi genre. what's your thoughs on Seveneves, guys?

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