It is currently 22 Oct 2017, 06:08

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 59 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 12 Jul 2013, 14:53 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
i've actually never seen this one, but have some friends who are extremely big on the sort of stuff so i'll have to grill them and extract a rip in the immediate future. thanks for the recommendation.. thats one of his first films, isn't it? he came up in a sogo ishii-related conversation recently so thanks for bringing him up again...

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 16 Jul 2013, 21:44 
Offline

Joined: 12 Jul 2013, 09:24
Posts: 138
Location: swedistan
*deleted*


Last edited by omen on 11 Nov 2016, 16:03, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Jul 2013, 03:22 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
i don't know about the sagely gallic sorts but you've certainly piqued my curiosity - going to make this tonight's bedtime watching experience, though the description pegs me for the type that would consequently off themselves. assuming i don't go through with some act of intense self-harm, i shall consequently give you my thoughts.

have you found it someplace, because i'm having difficulty locating it presently.. to my surprise.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Jul 2013, 13:40 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 28 May 2013, 09:58
Posts: 103
I just checked and it's on a private tracker I'm a member of, with English subs, but I haven't any invites at the moment, so I'll try to dl later and put it up on dropbox.

_________________
hazy, low res, bad light, crap decor, idiotic pose...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Jul 2013, 15:28 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
please do, i'd be (once again) in your debt. and i'll happily share leviathan in the process..

and another great thing i thought i'd share after having seen it recently..

Image

Quote:
A dizzying plunge into ecstatic communion in the guise of a period nerdfest, shot in black and white with a Sony AVC3260 and, for one nerve-rattling stretch, in warm color with a Bolex, Andrew Bujalski’s Computer Chess takes place over one weekend in the early Eighties in a drab hotel. The film was shot near Austin, Texas, but it has a distinctly Mass Turnpike/MIT vibe.

We begin in an “activity room” where an annual computer chess tournament is underway. There is immediate comedy in the brutal haircuts and polyester tops, the balance between ceremony and loose convocation, the unwieldy equipment (participants sit across tables next to their enormous computers, which dictate moves that they enact on plastic boards, said moves shown on a big screen via opaque projectors). And then there’s grand master Pat Henderson, perfectly embodied by Gerry Peary, who I have the pleasure of announcing as the winner of this year’s Best Performance by a Film Critic Award. Henderson’s initial appearance sets the tone for what is to come.

We’re looking at clouds and sunlight. “Hey! You’re shooting at the sun!” screams Henderson. “You’ll burn out the tube!!” This prompts a jerk of the camera and a cut to the man himself admonishing the off-screen operator. “Don’t ever shoot at the sun!” Visually, Computer Chess is designed to evoke mid-Sixties TV shows like Albany’s TV Tournament Time: infinite shades of softly delineated gray, split screens (employed to increasingly disorienting effect), explanatory text at the top of the screen, a 4:3 frame, strobing. Yet this is not a piece of nostalgia. Those idle shots of clouds and sun and Henderson’s authoritarian clampdown establish a pattern for the entire film, in which everyone keeps checking themselves, rationalizing their desire for fellowship or sexual congress and channeling it through one activity or prescribed course of conduct or another, be it a computer chess tournament, the ethos of swinging, or—hilariously—an encounter group in which the participants reenact their own births.

Bujalski is one sharp filmmaker, cultivating the appearance of random behavior while adhering to structures that appear to grow organically from the shooting. In the tournament scenes, he conveys something rare: the collective surge of fellow feeling among a roomful of individuals too embarrassed to articulate their joy in sharing the company of others with the same consuming interests (like computer chess; on a deeper level, artificial intelligence; deeper still, the possibility of identifying the source of life itself). Everyone either creates or participates in elaborate rituals in order to simply be in one another’s orbit. Yet they habitually check themselves, ensuring that the formalities are observed and the structures remain airtight. Don’t shoot into the sun!

Computer Chess has been mistaken for one kind of movie—a narrative about an introverted young man named Peter Bishton (Patrick Reister) enjoying an awkward coming-of-age experience—when it is, finally, a series of touchingly rhapsodic variations on communion and aloneness, desire and repression, control and chaos. The cast is a joy, from Austin animation guru Bob Sabiston to an unrecognizable Wiley Wiggins (from Dazed and Confused and Waking Life), from Bujalski regular Myles Paige as arrogant “rebel programmer” Mike Papageorge to novelist Jim Lewis, from Chris Doubek and Cyndi Williams as middle-aged swingers to real-life computer geniuses Gordon Kindlmann and James Curry. We’ve never seen such people in movies before—assistant branch manager types, entrepreneurs-in-the-making in corduroy suits, a young woman (Robin Schwartz’s Shelly) who is the very definition of mousy but who is one click or caress away from turning herself inside out with abandon. But then on every imaginable level, Computer Chess is one of the most original and satisfying movies I’ve seen in ages.


phpBB [video]


review via filmcomment

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Jul 2013, 22:13 
Offline

Joined: 12 Jul 2013, 09:24
Posts: 138
Location: swedistan
*deleted*


Last edited by omen on 11 Nov 2016, 16:03, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Jul 2013, 22:51 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
yes, would very much appreciate an invite.. also, just wanted to check/make sure that you got my email with vanity article attachments okay. cheers!

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 22 Jul 2013, 23:25 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
Omen, wanted to thank you very much for the invite. there are definitely amazing things there and the way to them seems relatively straightforward. I was a member at the time of its inception (long, long ago..) but there wasn't nearly quite so much action back then and my old account was eventually deactivated for inactivity.

Image

A friend notified me of a screening of Stan Brakhage's work being held at the hammer museum courtesy LACMA and the academy of motion picture arts and sciences. I didn't know what to expect other than that the academy maintaining the full archive of Brakhage's work and continuously performing restoration work with few opportunities to screen the resulting material. Although criterion put out two releases of SB's work, the second did quite poorly and only a fraction of his 300 films remains available to public besides the somewhat-infrequent screenings of this restored material.

Turned out this was a show being done in collaboration with werner herzog, who agreed to come out and talk a bit about his relationship with brakhage, which is just as well because he could be equally-entertaining if asked to opine on underwater basketweaving. for all his cinematic achievements, the man could just as well have had an eventful career in standup comedy. but i digress..

the films screened were unfamiliar to me, although one had apparently been released as part of the criterion collection and fairly well regarded. it served as the final installment in a trilogy that was shown. all of the subjects in this trilogy dealt with institutions of a certain gravity and fear to the filmmaker and, in their restored form, were some of the most remarkable work i've ever seen from someone whose work I thought I was relatively well-acquainted with.

the first shown was 'eyes', the title stemming from brakhage referring to the police as the public eyes of society, as seen through abstracted police ride-along cobbled together from shots wandering in focus and subject, sometimes warped reflections and distant lights alternating with precise, crisp images of a murder victim bleeding out on some god-forsaken Pittsburgh sidewalk in 1970. Herzog remarked that upon seeing some of SB's early work in a retrospective of american experimental cinema in the late 60s he felt the imagery association approach would one day become so commonplace that the audience would not perceive it as anything experimental or out of the ordinary, and this this the reaction it receives from myself as a representative of today's audience - for all the non-narrative labels that his work receives, it feels like there is some fairly clear narrative in this film and the others forming the trilogy, but it only goes so far as the staying power of the moments committed to stock with both the precision and looseness of an old master, nearly all of it edited in-camera. "film knows no mercy.."

Quote:
"I have been many times very ill in hospitals; and I drew on all that experience while making DEUS EX in West Pennsylvania Hospital of Pittsburgh; but I was especially inspired by the memory of one incident in an Emergency Room of SF's Mission District: while waiting for medical help, I had held myself together by reading an April-May 1965 issue of "Poetry Magazine"; and the following lines from Charles Olson's "Cole's Island" had especially centered the experience, "touchstone" of DEUS EX, for me: Charles begins the poem with the statement, "I met Death - ," and then: "He didn't bother me, or say anything. Which is / not surprising, a person might not, in the circumstances; / or at most a nod or something. Or they would. But they wouldn't, / or you wouldn't think to either, if it was Death. And / He certainly was, the moment I saw him." The film begins with this sense of such an experience and goes on to envision the whole battle of hospital on these grounds, thru to heart surgery seen as equivalent to Aztec ritual sacrifice ... the lengths men go to to avoid so simple and straight a relationship with Death as Charles Olson managed on/in "Cole's Island."'


This was something brakhage said regarding the second film shown in the program, a sort of ominous medical documentary. these films certainly come across as documentaries of a sort, or something the author referred to as 'documents', though not in the sense the term usually entails. not even in a way that could be comparable to herzog's documentarian work. seems like the closest would be the recent Leviathan and the harvard sensory enthnography lab's focus on conveying proportions of certain human experience. These too aim and deliver a certain uncanny quality through their author's subjective experience committed to film much in the way each person's memory commits experience, particularly a jarring or remarkable one, through indelible signifiers and leitmotifs. to my knowledge this film has not been released in any form, and the print restored three years ago had not been given a public screening until that night. i've located a really shitty VHS transfer someone must have made in ancient times and, well, what can i say? there's a reason why brakhage referred to home viewing formats as separate entities from the work in print because the contrast between what was shown on screen and what i saw on my computer's could not be any further apart to the great detriment of anyone who only has the vhs rip experience to go by. we can only hope that the restoration sees a release some day, as well as more frequent screenings here and beyond.

which brings me to the final film - the act of seeing with one's own eyes. this has seen some restoration and received yet more in the recent pass, having already been released by criterion a while back in their first collection. as the title says, nothing can quite stand up to the act of it. herzog seemed particularly uncomfortable with the film, later pointing out that its something he had tried to forget after seeing it 30 years ago, and held to his opinion that certain imagery brings man to such close proximity with his own mortality that looking away can only be so natural. apparently this repeat viewing nearly made herzog pass out with nausea. the film contains some of the most striking cinematic takes on the human body, and possibly the greatest cinematic tribute to the forensic pathologist's vocation. i don't really know what to say other than to again remind that this film is available as part of collections and online, and could speak for itself with far more gravity than anything my puny words can offer. the focus is wandering far less - were the subject of this trilogy's other films was a pulse of life culminating in an open heart surgery, this is about finality, laden with weight of discarded spare parts. sometimes the camera seems to evade the subject..sometimes the stare is unflinching, culminating in a momentary glance through the empty sockets of a skull filmed through its open back. not sure there is anything like this, and hard to imagine there will ever be again.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2014, 19:52 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 18:33
Posts: 338
not being anything of a film buff, stumbled across alexander medvedkin by way of chris marker... suppose most here are already up on this but i watched happiness last month and easily one of the best films i've seen this year. for those as yet unconvinced...

phpBB [video]


this should be required viewing for first year film students, not some chaplin dreck... mesmerizing, humorous and humane.

also: leviathan finally surfaced on pirate bay. will respond to that here,eventually, the trailer looked amazing

_________________
the eye of the beholder is in the eye of the beholder


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Jul 2014, 20:04 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
yeah, i've actually been meaning to write in this thread. i've finished subs to german's 'hard to be a god' recently, and maybe will make them available here for those interested.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 25 Jul 2014, 19:51 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
was recently able to catch a retrospective of Bruce Checefsky's work, aptly titled 'remaking the unseen'. Chechefsky is a director specialising in re-imagining films that have either been lost or never made at all, with a particular interest in early 20th century cinema. Many of the works are experimental films from europe during the 20s/30s that have been lost as a result of the war. Some are accounts of wartime atrocities that were turned into screenplays and never produced in their time, ostensibly due to the subject being too raw for their time. The premise, at least the underlying concept of the thing is fascinating, with many good questions and conversations to be had about, amongst other things, the issue of authorship..

the films themselves were quite disappointing despite the amount of effort, research, vintage film stock and equipment that was used to (re?)create them. Somehow i ended up feeling that this re-imagining had come to detract from the original works, even if they were lost.. The idea of what they were, what they could have been has been violated by someone apparently ill-equipped to do justice to the concept he had stumbled upon.

The one film in the evening's retrospective that seemed compelling was actually the exception - this was not a re-imagining of something lost, but instead a commissioned piece with a live score by some capable improv folks.

phpBB [video]


sometimes the resulting conversation seems more important than the work itself, and this may have been one of those occasions. given the breadth of what has been lost in the early years of cinema or, hell, even more recently, there is still opportunity to revive the lost, imagine the unseen without diminishing it in the process.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Jul 2014, 06:21 
Offline

Joined: 12 Jul 2013, 09:24
Posts: 138
Location: swedistan
*deleted*


Last edited by omen on 11 Nov 2016, 16:34, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Jul 2014, 17:10 
Offline

Joined: 28 Jan 2014, 05:27
Posts: 6
There are actually English subs out for Hard to Be a God now--not the best, but they work.

http://subscene.com/subtitles/its-hard-to-be-a-god-trudno-byt-bogom

Sound is incredible--sonically as swampy as the film is visually, especially the scenes shot indoors. Drip drip drip.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Jul 2014, 19:16 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
They're actually not bad, but not as good as the ones i just finished (ha-ha!) I should put those up already.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Jul 2014, 20:48 
Offline

Joined: 28 Jan 2014, 05:27
Posts: 6
Would you be willing to provide a copy? I would really like to screen this film (university-related context) and would definitely welcome better (or more thorough...there are certain patches in the copy I posted without text where there is still dialogue) subtitles.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Jul 2014, 23:01 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
alright. i'll have them up shortly.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Sep 2014, 20:33 
Offline
engineer
User avatar

Joined: 28 May 2013, 08:10
Posts: 774
Location: Germany
A nice article on Herzog: http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/sep/07/werner-herzog-facts-do-not-constitute-truth


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Sep 2014, 17:39 
Offline
porter
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 14:02
Posts: 1169
heh, he makes a lot of arguments for stoicism in general. once he had compared the emotional forwardness of the present to an over-lit room, in which nothing can really be properly seen because so much light is blowing out all the detail. presumably he is looking back to the good old days of being terribly repressed and self-conscious.

_________________
which pyre shall the moon ignite each hour
which pyre in my library crimson


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Sep 2014, 20:15 
Offline
engineer
User avatar

Joined: 28 May 2013, 08:10
Posts: 774
Location: Germany
A friend said the other day that Herzog is a perfect example of an existential thinker, and this article, as well as his films really show this: for example, the despair of Aguirre, on the screen, among the actors, and then transcribed to the audience watching the film... or Fitzcarraldo and its making! Or this more recent documentary Grizzly Man.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Sep 2014, 23:48 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: 27 May 2013, 18:33
Posts: 338
seems every time the word existential crops up it's in relation to someone or something i just plumb don't understand

“Man is a god when he dreams, but a beggar when he reflects.”

speak for yourself

“Facts do not constitute the truth. There is a deeper stratum.”

is that a fact or a, um, stratum?

goddamn brilliant filmmaker, though, no doubt

_________________
the eye of the beholder is in the eye of the beholder


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 59 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
cron

Forum hosting by ProphpBB | Software by phpBB | Report Abuse | Privacy